Stanton water plant gets upgrade

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Golden State Water Company last week hosted local community leaders on a tour of a new well and showcased upgrades at the company’s Stanton water plant that serveshigh quality water to 27,000 customers in Stanton, parts of Garden Grove, Cypress, Los Alamitos and Rossmoor.

The new well replaces a well built one in 1926 that was shut down due to age and deterioration. The old well was filled in as part of the project and permanently closed.

Golden State Water Company last week hosted local community leaders on a tour of a new well and showcased upgrades at the company’s Stanton water plant that serveshigh quality water to 27,000 customers in Stanton, parts of Garden Grove, Cypress, Los Alamitos and Rossmoor.

The new well replaces a well built one in 1926 that was shut down due to age and deterioration. The old well was filled in as part of the project and permanently closed.

Golden State determined that constructing a new replacement well at the Stanton location was the best alternative for customers. Water from this well will be significantly less expensive than purchased water from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. The California Public Utilities Commission approved the project in a previous rate case.

“Constructing this new well provides a safe and economical water supply that benefits our customers,” says Golden State Water Company District Manager Robert Hanford.

The new well is 1,300 feet deep, which is deeper than the Empire State Building is tall. The well is designed to produce 2,500 gallons of water per minute. 

The four-year project, which cost approximately $2.6 million, included the installation of a new pump, well pump house, plant piping and electrical upgrades. The project also included numerous site improvements including updating the chemical feed system, fencing and the installation of a drainage system.

Golden State believes that proactive system maintenance is critical to protecting water service now and for future generations. Delaying or deferring needed improvements can be more costly and jeopardize the reliability of a water system.